Maher Atteya, Ph.D.

Education

Georgia State University – Clarkston Campus

Certificate of Online Teaching and Learning, Online Quality Matters Certification for Online Classes, 2009 – 2010
Professional Career Development Institute – Georgia
Diploma in Computer Design, Computer Science, 2001 – 2003
Cleveland Institute of Electronics
Diploma in Computer Programming and Operation, Computer Science, 1996 – 1998

University of Denver

Post Doctoral Studies in surface/Heterogeneous. Catalysis related to the Environment, Physical Chemistry, 1996 – 1998

Colorado School of Mines

Ph.D. in Applied Chemistry – Minor: Petroleum Engineering, 1990 – 1994

Kansas State University

M.S. in Chemistry, Inorganic Physical Chemistry, 1987 – 1990

Carl Schorlemmer Technische Hochschule

B.S. and MS. in Chemical Engineering – Germany, Surface and Heterogenous Catalysis – Petroleum Craking, 1976 – 1982
Experience

Professor of Chemistry  at   Georgia State University – Clarkston Campus

September 2012  –  Present (3 years 6 months)

Representative of 2 year community colleges at the Nano Science Research and Technology Board  at Clark Atlanta University Nano Research Center

August 2008  –  August 2012
Working with graduate and undergraduate students in their research topics during the summer semesters
Associate Professor of Chemistry  at   Georgia State University – Clarkston Campus
August 2007  –  August 2012
Teaching undergraduate students general and general chemistry and organic chemistry. Using and developing several teaching methods:  Problem Based Lectures POGIL Flipped Lectures to name a few.
Nano Science-PLASM Researcher/Advisor  at   Clark Atlanta University
2010  –  2012
Nano Science-PLASM Researcher/Advisor  at   Clark Atlanta University
2010  –  2012
Adjunct Chemistry Faculty  at   Agnes Scott College
June 2008 – June 2009
Supervising undergraduate general chemistry labs.
Online Chemistry Instructor  at   CAL Campus
June 2007 – June 2009
Teaching organic and general chemistry fully online for senior high school students as well as undergraduate students.
Science Department Chair  at   Georgia State University
August 2004  –  August 2008
Managing a science department which is a multiple disciplinary science department. 25 faculty and 10 staff at Decatur campus.
Assistant Professor of Chemistry  at   Georgia State University
August 2000  –  August 2007
Teaching Survey Chemistry 1 and 2 lectures and labs, Principal of Chemistry 1 and 2 lectures and labs online Using WebCT Vista. Developing General Chemistry lectures which are taught online (virtually).
Instructor of Chemistry  at   Life University
August 1998  –  August 2000
Managing and teaching general chemistry and organic chemistry classes for the Chiropractic undergraduate students.
Adjunct Chemistry Faculty  at   Clayton State University
June 1999 – June 2000
Teaching introduction to Organic Chemistry and Biochemistry lectures.
Adjunct Faculty  at   Georgia State University
June 1999 – June 2000
Teaching introduction to Organic Chemistry and Biochemistry, general chemistry 1 and 2 lectures and Labs.
Summer Undergraduate Research Advisor  at   Georgia State University
June 1996  –  August 1996
An academic adviser of Undergraduate Summer Research Program for Science Majors (called BRIDGE Fellowship Program)  at Georgia State University.
Visiting Professor  at   Colorado School of Mines
August 1994  –  August 1996
Teaching and managing undergraduate general chemistry lectures and labs.
Part Tme Lab Coordinator at  Colorado School of Mines
August 1992  –  August 1993
Managing and preparing general, analytical, physical and organic chemistry labs. Preparing solutions and teaching some undergraduate senior special topics labs. Managing and dispensing chemicals and glassware. Preparing solutions of Physical Chemistry, Organic and integrated labs. Trouble shoot and maintain maintain HPLC, GC, GC-MS,
Graduate Teaching Assistant at  Colorado School of Mines
August 1991  –  August 1993
Courses Taught: General Chemistry lab, sophomore Quantitative Analytical chemistry lag, senior/junior Chemistry integrated lab (which includes analytical organic and analytical inorganic projects using various chemical instrumentation such as GC, H – NMR, GC – MS, UV visible, IR, Atomic absorption HPLC, boiling and melting determination instrumentation, Jet Fuel Thermal Oxidation Tester (JFTOT)).
Graduate Research Assistant  at   Kansas State University
June 1988 – June 1990
Working with and developing high vacuum apparatus made of glass and used for catalyst activation / regeneration. Working with surface area characterizing instrumentation such as solution calorimeter, BETsurface Area Determination Instrument, X – ray Diffraction
Teaching Assistant  at   Carl Schorlemmer Technische Hochschule
June 1976 – June 1977
Teaching undergraduate chemistry labs for integrated chemistry labs which are attended by high school and college students.
Certification
Online Courses Reviewer
April 2009 to April 2010
Quality Matters Certification

Languages

English                                                  (Full professional proficiency)
Arabic                                                    (Native or bilingual proficiency)
German                                                 (Full professional proficiency)
American Sign Language                 (Professional working proficiency)

Publications

Metal Oxide Particles as Chemical Reagents: Heat of Adsorption of Heteroatom – Containing Organic on Heat – Treated Magnesium Oxide Samples of Varying Surface Areas,

Chem. Materials   January 1, 1991
Authors: Maher Atteya, Ph.D., K. J. Klabunde
Heats of adsorption (immersion) were measured via a solution calorimeter for a series of heteroatom (oxygen, sulfur, phosphorus) containing organic compounds on thermally activated magnesium oxide (heat treated
at 7000C overnight in vacuo followed by cooling to room temperature). For phosphates, phosphites, and phosphines the heats of adsorption were high and showed a small dependence on substituent effects. For sulfur compounds, -S-H-containing compounds yielded the highest values. For oxygen systems very high heats of adsorption were found for carbonyl compounds. In addition, the strongly basic nature of the MgO surface was demonstrated by the extremely high heats of adsorption/reaction with carboxylic acids. Heats observed for 1-butanol adsorption varied linearly with MgO surface area. Surprisingly, cyclohexane dilution of 1-butanol caused a dramatic lowering of adsorption heats, demonstrating the competitive nature of even such unreactive solvents. The observed heats of adsorption/reaction combined with spectroscopic data allowed some conclusions about the type of surface bonding that took place. The strong interactions of several of these organics demonstrate the nature of heat-treated MgO as a destructive adsorbent for many toxic chemicals. Since MgO is nontoxic and inexpensive and can be prepared in highly surface activated forms, it shows promise for use in air-purification schemes.

Adsorption and Decomposition of Organophosphorus Compounds on Nanoscale Metal Oxide Particles:

In Situ GCMS of Pulsed Microreactions over Magnesium Oxide
Chem. of Materials   1992
Authors: Maher Atteya, Ph.D., K. J. Klabunde, 0. Koper, Y.X. Li
Using an in-situ pulsed reactor GC-MS system, the thermal decomposition of organophosphorus compounds (as models of nerve agents) has been compared with their destructive adsorption on high surface area magnesium oxide. Dramatically lower temperatures are required when MgO is present. Volatile products evolved were formic acid, water, alcohols, and alkenes. At higher temperatures CO, CH4, and water predominated. Phosphorus residues remained completely immobilized. Addition of water enhanced the facility of MgO to destroy these compounds, and in fact, water pulses were found to partially regenerate a spent MgO bed. Using 110 labeling, some aspects of the reaction mechanisms were clarified and in particular showed that oxygen scrambling occurred. Surface OH and MgO groups transferred oxygen in the formation of formic acid, and surface mobility and reactivity of adsorbed groups was very high. The substantial capacity of high surface area MgO for destruction and immobilization of such toxic substances makes it attractive for air purification schemes as well as solid reagents for destruction and immobilization of bulk quantities of hazardous phosphorus compounds or organohalides. Fourier Transform Infrared Photoacoustic Spectroscopy Study

Interaction of SOx and NOx with Soot

Symposia Preprints, Div. Fuel. Chem,. Am. Chem. Soc.,   1996
Authors: Maher Atteya, Ph.D., B K. Konowalshuk, M. L. Rosenberger, D. M. Smith, A. R. Chughta
“Current research is related to the interaction of gas phase molecules with solid surfaces, and now is mostly focused on the nature and reactivity of black carbon (soot), produced through the combustion of fossil fuels. Previous work provided a characterization of the soot structure and surface which has been useful in studying its reactions, including their kinetics and mechanisms, with gaseous species of atmospheric interest. Recent research has emphasized the heterogeneous reactions of soot with oxides of nitrogen and sulfur, and ozone, studied through spectroscopic and microgravimetric techniques. Other questions being addressed by kinetics studies include catalysis, hydration mechanisms, the behavior of multiple reactants, and photochemical effects. Also under study is the role of the solid (soot) phase in these reactions, including unpaired electrons (by EPR), trace metals/mineral content, and particle size and morphology”

Absorbed Molecular Oxygen and the Surface Behavior of Soot

Symposia Preprints, Div. Fuel. Chem., Am. Chem. Soc   1986 Authors: Maher Atteya, Ph.D., B K. Konowalshuk, M. L. Rosenberger, D. M. Smith, A. R. Chughta
Previously reported research, demonstrating a role of adsorbed molecular oxygen in the reaction of ozone with soot particles and in their hydration, has been extended to explore the interaction between O2 and SO2, O3, H2O, NH3, NO2 and NO at the soot surface as well as the effect of these adsorbates on each other. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and microgravimetry have revealed the extent of interactions between some competing reactants on soot. EPR has been used as a probe of the surface behavior of paramagnetic species (O2, NO2, NO) through their effect on the intensity of a large signal which is the result of the high concentration of unpaired electrons in soots. The effects of diamagnetic reactants (H2O, NH3, SO2) also are measured through their influence on the paramagnetic adsorbates and thus on the EPR signal. Microgravimetric measurements of adsorption and changes in the mass resulting from surface reactions also have enabled interpretations of the behavior of reactants on soot particles. Details of the modes of adsorption of SO2, NO2 and NH3 on n-hexane soot have emerged from these measurements as well.
Adsorption and adsorbate interaction at soot particle surfaces
Carbon  1998
Authors: Maher Atteya, Ph.D., J. Kim, B.K. Konowalchuk, A.R. Chughtai, D.M. Smith
Previously reported research, demonstrating a role of adsorbed molecular oxygen in the reaction of ozone with soot particles and in their hydration, has been extended to explore the interaction between O2 and SO2, O3, H2O, NH3, NO2 and NO at the soot surface as well as the effect of these adsorbates on each other. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and microgravimetry have revealed the extent of interactions between some competing reactants on soot. EPR has been used as a probe of the surface behavior of paramagnetic species (O2, NO2, NO) through their effect on the intensity of a large signal which is the result of the high concentration of unpaired electrons in soots. The effects of diamagnetic reactants (H2O, NH3, SO2) also are measured through their influence on the paramagnetic adsorbates and thus on the EPR signal. Microgravimetric measurements of adsorption and changes in the mass resulting from surface reactions also have enabled interpretations of the behavior of reactants on soot particles. Details of the modes of adsorption of SO2, NO2 and NH3 on n-hexane soot have emerged from these measurements as well.

Carbonaceous particle hydration

Journal: Atmospheric Environment   1999
Authors: Maher Atteya, Ph.D., G. R. Williams, A. R. Chughtai, D. M. Smith
Microgravimetric measurements of the hydration of several different black carbons or soots and a series of commercial carbon blacks have been carried out, over a relative humidity range of 20–85%, in an extension of earlier work with the model n-hexane soot. All adsorption isotherms are of type III and were analyzed by the use of the Dubinin–Radushkevich (DR) equation which, although applicable over a limited range of intermediate relative humidity values, allows identification of chemisorption limit and onset of multilayer formation. While surface area determines the maximum adsorption possible for a given type, surface functionalities are determinative at lower humidity and are characteristic of the soot-producing fuel. Aging of carbon particles and oxygen chemisorption as well as O2 physisorption strongly influence the extent of hydration for those soots studied, such as JP-8 aviation and diesel fuels. Infrared spectra confirm the surface oxidation of JP-8 soot by its reaction with O3, a reaction of probable atmospheric importance, as underlying its increased hydration.

Carbonaceous particle hydration II

Journal: Atmospheric Environment   1999
Authors: Maher Atteya, Ph.D., N.J. Miller, G.R. Williams, A.R. Chughtai,, D.M. Smith
Microgravimetric measurements of the hydration of several different black carbons or soots and a series of commercial carbon blacks have been carried out, over a relative humidity range of 20–85%, in an extension of earlier work with the model n-hexane soot. All adsorption isotherms are of type III and were analyzed by the use of the Dubinin–Radushkevich (DR) equation which, although applicable over a limited range of intermediate relative humidity values, allows identification of chemisorption limit and onset of multilayer formation. While surface area determines the maximum adsorption possible for a given type, surface functionalities are determinative at lower humidity and are characteristic of the soot-producing fuel. Aging of carbon particles and oxygen chemisorption as well as O2 physisorption strongly influence the extent of hydration for those soots studied, such as JP-8 aviation and diesel fuels. Infrared spectra confirm the surface oxidation of JP-8 soot by its reaction with O3, a reaction of probable atmospheric importance, as underlying its increased hydration.less

Honors and Awards

Clark Atlanta University Center of Nano Science and Technology Fellowship – 2 year Colleges representative

Clark Atlanta University Center of Nano Science and Technology June 2008
A fellowship of summer undergraduate research.
Who is Who for Best Educator in Georgia
Who is Who for Best Educator August 2008
Emory University PRISM Program Fellowship Emory University
June 2007
Fellowship in Problem Based Learning.

Governor Excellent Teacher’s Fellowship

University System of Georgia June 2006
A fellowship awarded by the Governor of State of Georgia through the University System of Georgia.

Excellent National Educator for 2-Year Colleges for the Year 2005

National Teacher of the Year August 2005
Best Educator for 2 year colleges for the Year 2005.for the whole 2 year colleges in the US.

Certificate of Achievement – Connecting Teachers and Technology

Georgia State University August 2001

Outstanding Achievement Award

University of Denver June 1996
Outstanding Achievement Award for post doctoral research at University of Denver.

Certification and Acknowledgment Award

University of Denver August 1996
Certification and Acknowledgment Award for post doctoral research at University of Denver.
Recognition Award
Colorado School of Mines March 1994

Outstanding Teaching Assistant Award

Colorado School of Mines April 1982

Karen Morehouse Best Paper Award

Kansas State University June 1991
1991 conference on Hazardous Waste Research

Organizations

American Chemical Society

January 2001 to August 2010
Attending and participating in workshops, seminars and webinar

Georgia Academy of Sciences

Member
August 2001 to Present
Presenting Summer Undergraduate Research Results

2YC3 – 2 year community colleges association, an affiliation of ACS

Member
August 2010 to Present
2 year community colleges association, sub unit and affiliate of American Chemical Society organization. Attending and participating in workshops, seminars and webinar

Georgia Association of Educators/National Association of Educators

Member
August 2010 to Present
Attending and participating in workshops, seminars and webinar

Georgia Science Teachers Association

Member
August 2010 to Present
Georgia Science Teachers Association.

Center of Nano Technology Research Committee – Clark Atlanta University

Adviser /Member August 2008 to Present
Working with graduate and undergraduate students in their research topics during the summer semesters

Editor of Scientific Journals International (SJI)

Editor/Member
June 2004 to Present
Editing Chemistry Related Topics and Papers and Articles.

Blackboard Cooperate Club

Member
August 2012 to Present
Attending and participating in workshops, seminars and webinar

Wiley Faculty Network

Member
August 2001 to Present
Attending and participating in workshops, seminars and webinar

McGraw-Hill Faculty Network

Member
January 2014 to Present
Attending and participating in workshops, seminars and webinar

Projects

Flipped Class Model

August 2014 to Present
Developing, Designing and Teaching Survey of Chemistry 1 course using Flipped Model
Hybrid Survey of Chemistry Lab May 2014 to Present
Developing, Designing and Teaching Hybrid Survey of Chemistry Labs.

Fully Online Survey and Principles of Chemistry Labs

August 2014 to Present
Developing, Designing and Planning to teach Survey of Chemistry 1 and Principles of Chemistry (General Chemistry) Labs Fully online on the year 2015.

Community Outreach – Clarkston Georgia

June 2012 to Present
Helping and assisting groups of immigrants located at Georgia through a Community Outreach Program. Tutoring and advising the children of these immigrants. Helping their parents in teaching them English Language.

Volunteering Experience

Volunteer/Member  at   Somali American Community Center

June 2012  – Present (3 years 9 months)
Helping and assisting groups of immigrants located at Georgia through a Community Outreach Program. Tutoring and advising the children of these immigrants. Helping their parents in teaching them English Language.

Skills & Expertise

Virtual General Chemistry Courses Developer,
Online Courses Designer and instructor
Surface Chemistry
Catalysis
Crude Oil Cracking
Distance Learning
Computer Programming
Computer Repair – Hardware
Virtual Chemistry Lab Dev
Online Courses Developer, Designer and instructor
Nano materials Science and Technology
Soot Chemistry
Jet Fuel Chemistry
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